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This section offers you a comprehensive introduction to the Neumann company, as well as an extensive overview of the company history and the products which have previously been placed on the market.

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One Step Ahead Again: The TLM Technology
At the 1983 AES-Convention in Amsterdam, Neumann unveiled a brand new series of microphones with refined circuitry: the TransformerLess Microphones of the "fet 100" series. The first representative of this series was the switchable TLM 170 with five directional patterns from which to choose. It used the same dual-diaphragm capsule as its somewhat older, transformer-equipped brother, the U 89.

Each microphone represented a considerable improvement in the common dynamic range of studio microphones at its respective time of introduction. Their electronics evidenced lower residual noise and, simultaneously, higher modulation levels than predecessor models. Furthermore, they were also a novelty in the market because they were the first to provide wide-angle cardioid and hypercardioid directional patterns in addition to the omnidirectional, cardioid, and figure-eight patterns common at the time.

The "especially open, free sound " of the TLM technology, which made it possible to transmit fine structures "as if a curtain had been pulled aside", encouraged Neumann to quickly equip other microphones with this system.

In order to be able to fit the complex circuitry into miniature microphones, however, it first took an additional development step: hybrid technology. This technology even made it possible to incorporate all electronics right in the capsule housing, thus giving rise to the "active capsules" of the KM 100 series.

So Neumann's miniature microphones not only took another clear step toward improved technical data, but now the capsules could be used with the help of accessories such as goosenecks, stand mounts, various cables, and tilting devices without electro-acoustic loss.

This miniature microphone family now comprises seven different capsules with all customary directional patterns. These also include stereo mounts for XY, ORTF and MS recording techniques.

TLM 170
TLM 170
Hybrid circuit
Hybrid circuit
Active capsules AK 40 and AK 20 of the KM 100-series (1988/1996)
Active capsules AK 40 and AK 20 of the KM 100-series (1988/1996)
The Specialists
Besides the aforementioned dummy head, in 1992 the KFM 100 Spherical Surface Microphone was introduced for an additional stereo recording method.

This microphone had two small, high-quality condenser capsules arrayed on the diameter of a head-sized wooden sphere. In the GFM 132 Boundary Layer Microphone, these capsules had been optimised for sound received at oblique angles. Thus the KFM 100 was a microphone for especially natural stereo recordings with tremendous acoustic depth, making it ideal for miking highly complex acoustic fields, such as those found in churches and large halls.

Especially for outdoor recordings the RSM 191 stereo shotgun microphone was developed. The recording angle of this MS combination can be adjusted for the most diverse recording situations.

KFM 100 (1992)
KFM 100 (1992)
GFM 132 (1990)
GFM 132 (1990)
RSM 191 (1988)
RSM 191 (1988)


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